Monday Window: Shinde Chatri, Pune, India, 27/3/17…

During my tour of the history of Pune city, a visit was made to Shinde Chatri, a memorial to 18th-century military leader Mahadji Shinde.

The Anglo-Rajasthani style of construction has exquisite and detailed carvings and an imposing three-storey facade. Within the building is a temple dedicated to Lord Shiva. Photographs inside are forbidden, but I did snap one before I was advised of the rule and kindly admonished. Continue reading

Thursday Doors, at the Shaniwar Wada, 2/3/17…

Shaniwarwada (Śanivāravāḍā) is a historical fortification in the city of Pune in Maharashtra, India. Built in 1732, it was the seat of the Peshwas of the Maratha Empire until 1818, when the Peshwas lost control to the British East India Company after the Third Anglo-Maratha War. Following the rise of the Maratha Empire, the palace became the center of Indian politics in the 18th century.

The fort itself was largely destroyed in 1828 by an unexplained fire, but the surviving structures are now maintained as a tourist site.

As part of my walking tours in Pune, we visited this huge site within the city. Magnificent spiked doors command the entrance, the spikes were to repel elephants.As the sight is a big attraction in the city, it’s impossible to get a shot without people in it, however, the people give a great size comparison to these magnificent doors. Continue reading

Thursday Doors: Pune, India, streetside, 23/2/17…

Walking around the city streets of Pune, so many interesting doors to frame in my shots.

Streetside catches with some cheerful people happy to smile for my camera.

Much disrepair surrounding the streets, the buildings a throwback from the much earlier days of the city construction, but colorful, chaotic and teeming with life. Continue reading

Thursday Doors: Raj Bhavan, Pune, 16/2/17

Last weekend I ended up in Pune, India.

My very first trip to India, sadly only for three days and I now wonder why I hadn’t taken the India plunge far earlier. It’s easier now, with the advent of the Indian e-visa, but travel in India certainly needs some patience. Continue reading