Random moments, 4/8/17, Blue ones…

Today WordPress tells me that it’s three years since I created my blog. Where has the time gone?

At this point, a grateful thank you to all those who are following me, your likes and comments are always most welcome and hugely appreciated and inspire me to carry on.

I didn’t really do anything with the blog until January 2016 when I thought I’d best get started and joined into the Blogging-U courses and I seemed to spend January, February and March 2016 with my head down in all sorts of wonderful courses which gave me the confidence and desire to start blogging and I dived into the April 2016 A-Z challenge with great enthusiasm.

For most of 2016 and early 2017, I followed weekly challenges diligently, posted about my travels when I could but since April 2017, I’ve not been quite so motivated.

Dealing with a personal loss, doing quite a bit of travelling and I haven’t caught up with the photo organisation for my travels since April, as, even though I no longer work, I seem to have too much to do or maybe I take longer to do too much!

When I was working I was far more attuned to a schedule and deadlines.

I suspect it’s time to add some daily task scheduling into my life to make sure I don’t let my days drift away. However, I haven’t drifted for many years so I’m quite enjoying the feeling, especially in the Cyprus summer heat where it’s too hot to be rushing around.

Whilst I am tediously trying to lose the iCloud from my life and re-organise photos in another cloud storage, so I am not constantly reminded by Apple my storage is full and to pay yet more money to preserve my data, I’m coming across some random photo moments.

So, to keep my hand in and re-motivate myself, I’m starting some “Random moment” posts from my life and travels over the past few years.

Here are a couple of slightly surreal shots taken at the Dubai Mall in August 2015, when the outside temperature hit 50, taken through the aquarium window, viewed from mall walkways.

The 10-million litre Dubai Aquarium tank, located on the Ground Level of The Dubai Mall, is one of the largest suspended aquariums in the world.

It houses thousands of aquatic animals, comprising over 140 species. Over 300 Sharks and Rays live in this tank, including the largest collection of Sand Tiger Sharks in the world.

The main Aquarium tank, which measures 51 metres in length, 20 metres in width and
11 metres in height.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Satisfaction…

Sometimes, it’s just capturing the beauty of nature for a brief moment that gives me the greatest satisfaction…

Utetheisa pulchella (Linnaeus, 1758), photographed on the Akamas peninsula, Paphos district, Cyprus, June 2017.

Satisfaction

Weekly Photo Challenge: Unusual…

Before the storm, Zanzibar, June 207.

Living between the Middle East and Cyprus, it’s unusual to see skies such as this in both regions

More often than not, the Middle East’s skies are obscured by a layer of sand and haze is the norm. Cyprus has clear and gloriously blue skies for most of the year, wonderful sunsets during the summer, but when it comes to a storm the skies are usually overcast.

The dramatic African skies gave portent of the deluge to come and when the rain finally came, the results were torrential…

Unusual

 

 

 

Thursday Doors, 20/7/17, Stonetown, Zanzibar, a little taster…

Eid 2017 holiday break, a time to visit Zanzibar and Tanzania.

Adjusting the holiday plan on the fly, the delights of the north of the island of Zanzibar had been covered in two days and a third night was overdoing it, so we added in a night in Stonetown, the old capital, and hub of the island.

I would have left Zanzibar with huge regrets if we hadn’t made the change.We are really not sun bed loungers at our age, I want to see it all whilst I can and recover once back home!

There is so much history in Stonetown which connects with the Middle East, in one way that is, thankfully, now not part of modern life. Zanzibar was famous worldwide for it’s spices and it’s slaves.

During the 19th century, Zanzibar was known all over the world as “A fabled land of spices, a vile center of slavery, a place of origins of expeditions into the vast, mysterious continent, the island was all these things during its heyday in the last half of the 19th century.”

A chequered past, Portuguese rulers from 1503 for two centuries, then in 1698 Zanzibar became part of the overseas holdings of Oman, falling under the control of the Sultan of Oman.

A lucrative trade in slaves and ivory thrived, along with an expanding plantation economy centering on cloves. With an excellent harbor and no shortage of fresh water, Stone Town (capital of Zanzibar) became one of the largest and wealthiest cities in East Africa. Of all the forms of economic activity on Zanzibar, slavery was the most profitable and the vast majority of the blacks living on the island were either slaves taken from East Africa or the descendants of slaves from East Africa.

The slaves were brought to Zanzibar in dhows, where many as possible were packed in with no regard for comfort or safety. Every year, about 40 to 50, 000 slaves were taken to Zanzibar. About a third went to work on clove and coconut plantations of Zanzibar and Pemba while the rest were exported to Persia, Arabia, the Ottoman Empire and Egypt.  Tippu Tip was the most notorious slaver, under several sultans, and also a trader, plantation owner and governor. Zanzibar’s spices attracted ships from as far away as the United States, which established a consulate in 1837.

The United Kingdom’s early interest in Zanzibar was motivated by both commerce and the determination to end the slave trade. In 1822, the British signed the first of a series of treaties with Sultan Said to curb this trade, but not until 1876 was the sale of slaves finally prohibited. Under strong British pressure, the slave trade was officially abolished in 1876, but slavery itself remained legal in Zanzibar until 1897.

The British Empire gradually took over; the relationship was formalized by the 1890 Heligoland-Zanzibar Treaty, leading to independence in 1963, but a revolution in 1964 created the People’s Republic of Zanzibar and Pemba. Several thousand ethnic Arab (5,000-12,000 Zanzibaris of Arabic descent) and Indian civilians were murdered and thousands more detained or expelled, either their property confiscated or destroyed.

On 26 April 1964, the mainland colony of Tanganyika united with Zanzibar to form the United Republic of Tanzania. Zanzibar remains a semi-autonomous region of Tanzania.

This is my kind of place, history around every corner, lives being lived in amongst the faded glory and, what was so nice, to stumble across and be a part of such fun Eid celebrations. So many happy people, out and about, dressed up in such vibrant outfits and enjoying the holiday. We were welcomed everywhere, but more on that another day, another post.

The doors of Stonetown are famed and fabled. It was yet another door heaven, every step revealed one that couldn’t be passed by. Delving into the the door history of Stonetown, it appeared the greater the wealth, the greater the doors to show it off. But there is so much detail, too much to add here without the reader’s eyes glazing over. This link from the Stonetown Heritage society is well worth a read if you would like to know more about this fascinating city of doors.

Enjoy these glorious doors from Stonetown’s past….please hover over the photos for captions.

 

This is only the first night’s door collation. There are more to come.

Apparently, there are 800 worthy Stonetown doors. I think I found a few that won’t be included in any official concatenation, but the rest of my shots are saved for those days when my Thursday has few doors…

Grateful thanks to Wiki and a variety of links for the condensed (really, it is whittled down) history of Zanzibar I have inserted. If you a serious door lover, it’s well worth googling “Doors of Stonetown” as there are numerous links and images.

Adding my offering into Norm Frampton’s excellent Thursday Door challenge… pop on over, hit the blue button and see doors from a multitude of places, plus some interesting backgrounds…

Weekly Photo Challenge: Focus…

I love photographing through the water. The refraction of the light combined with the movement of water gives an other-worldly feel and it’s even better when you find something special in the water.

Jellyfish, swimming through the water are not easy to catch in focus.

Neither are starfish under water.

And here’s the location, in focus. Beautiful Honda Bay, Palawan, The Philippines.

 

Focus

Thursday Doors, 15/6/16, Tomar, Portugal….

My visit to Portugal in April 2017 encompassed some time in Central Portugal and a few days in Lisbon. My dear friends, who live in the center of this beautiful country took me to visit some of the most wonderful places in this region of Portugal, one of which was the town of Tomar in the district of Santarem.

The doors of Tomar town, of which there are many worthy of inclusion in a door post, were a delight to find as we walked through the narrow, Calcada or mosaic, paved streets, traditional all over Portugal. Tomar was established in the 12th century within the walls of the Castle and Convent of Christ, which sits high above the town. The centre of town is the Praça da República (Republic Square) and Paços do Concelho (17th century Town Hall).

Entering town, this striking church needed to be caught for posterity…

And then, doors to catch on every side of the narrow cobbled streets…

and then into the main square, cobbled, lined with old buildings and the 15th/16th century Church of São João Baptista in the middle. The bronze statue represents Gualdim Pais, founder of the town.

 

This flower-bedecked headress is worn during The Festa dos Tabuleiros (Festival of the Trays). This festa is one of the most important religious festivals in Portugal. Held every 4 years during June or July in the town of Tomar, the tabuleiros, which the girls carry in the procession are decorated with symbols of the Holy Spirit: on top of the tray there is a pigeon and the crown, and from the top to the bottom, 30 loaves of bread, colourful paper flowers and ears of corn

 

and after the admiration of the square and church, a little stroll down the main street, some traditional tiled buildings to add into the visual feast…

 We needed a little refreshment in the square before heading up to Tomar Castle and Convent of the Order of Christ (saved for a future post). I needed to buy my dear friends a big drink after their graciousness in indulging my door mania and where better to sit than this cafe in the main square, surrounded by beautiful doors, windows and pigeons! 

 

And to end today’s post, how could I resist this opportunistic finale as we headed back to the car…

Linking with Thursday Doors, hosted by Norm Frampton. Pop over, hit the blue button and check out some of the other doors on display today…

 

 

Monday Window, stained glass at Bristol Cathedral, 12/6/17…

I’ve always been quite partial to stained glass. I’m in awe of the work required to create windows in stained glass and where better to see stained glass but in the United Kingdom’s churches and cathedrals. Continue reading

Weekly photo challenge: Friend…

This is Squint, my evil and (slightly adorable) feline occupant in my home, who decided to adopt my house as her luxury 5* place to be spoilt… We all jump to Squint’s squeals when she feels neglected, it’s easier to pander to Squint really…the yowls when you neglect her are just awful….suspect Squint is angling for a place in my will, she does do a wonderful foot-rub and I seem to have to won over on the pain of the nip/bite of my toes if I don’t place the toes just so… Such an angsty feline, but if she didn’t trot out of her waiting place when I park my car, I would be a tad worried….Bless her nasty little claws, I do love her to bits and, actually, I do worry if she doesn’t come home on time to give me miaow grief…

Friend

Thursday Doors, 1/6/17, door paintings…

At the moment, I’m back in Cyprus, with the intention of clearing “stuff” from my house.

You know, that stuff that accumulates through your life, sentimental, inherited, from hobbies and just, well, stuff.

I decided to tackle my art folder. Art has followed me around all my life. Somewhere in Uk, there is even my Art college work, but that’s in my sister’s loft, so can wait, it’s not in Cyprus, so it isn’t current stuff.

Whilst trawling through old art pads I came across these door paintings I did in 1997 and 1998, 3 doors from Malta and one from Nicosia. I’ll save the Cretan door poster I bought in 1982 ( honestly) for another week!

Even then, all those years ago I was a door girl 🙂  Continue reading

Weekly Photo challenge : Evanescent…

This week, WordPress weekly photo challenge asks us to show us a moment in time that holds meaning for you.

My photo was taken under the bridge that connects the mainland of Oman to Shannah port for the ferry to the island of Masirah.

I was using my new camera, a Fujifilm X-T20 and I had little idea of the settings when I took this, having been taught manual photography in the Nikon world. Each time you move, you have to understand the product-speak to relate to what you know..

( I am impatient, black mark) but a lesson to self, this is a camera that needs to be loved and cared for, the results are incredible

My past is in art and I see this shot in this way, even though the exposure is all wrong, the colours are intensified, it just gives a clue to what you can do to play with a picture…This shot is my played out and edited result…

 

Evanescent

 

Monday Window: Amsterdam windows (2), 29/5/17

Well now, there are so many windows in Amsterdam worthy of posting it was hard to know which to choose.

So I decided to start at the beginning instead of randomly choosing.

The first day I took a canal trip to relax, get my bearings and enjoy puttering around the central canals, building and people watching. Come and join me to crane upwards to admire the architecture and of course, the windows… Continue reading

Thursday doors, Pombal, Portugal, 25/5/17…

Whilst I was on my travels in Europe in April, I also headed off to Portugal to connect with some dear friends from the Middle East who have chosen to settle in Central Portugal. (Cue to use a poppy photo from Central Portugal as my featured image, trying to sneak them in!) Continue reading