Thursday Doors, 19/10/17. Searching hard for doors, Theletra, Cyprus….

I’m now back home in Cyprus for a few weeks and after an intense few days of cleaning and gardening and needing an escape, I linked up with a good friend who enjoys poking around the old villages in our district with a camera and I was very happy to find that she also loves doors!

We headed off to explore the village of Theletra in the Paphos district of Cyprus. The old village of Theletra is nestled half-way up the mountain and the new village is now built above. The old village was abandoned because of an earthquake that made the village susceptible to landslides. The exact date is not verified.

But, I found it difficult to find doors in Theletra, there are frames, with views, but every abandoned house is open to the elements, but I did find one…

Please hover over for the photos for the story captions…

I found the only doors at the village church. The outer doors were modern, unattractive and not worthy of inclusion sadly, but inside, finally a worthy door centrally placed in the Iconostasis ( In Eastern Christianity an iconostasis (plural: iconostases) is a wall of icons and religious paintings, separating the nave from the sanctuary in a church.)

Linking with Thursday Doors, hosted by Norm Frampton. Pop on over to his link, click on the blue frog link at the end of his post and check out some gorgeous doors this week…

 

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Skywatch Friday, 31/8/17. A Cyprus sunset…

Sunset at Paphos harbor. The oddly shaped silhouettes are part of an installation for Paphos’s hosting of European City of Culture 2017. They are the local school’s creative interpretations of the Lemba lady from the Chalcolithic Period.

Linking with Skywatch Friday

Thursday Doors, 10/8/17. To Apostolos Andreas Monastery, Cyprus…

 

Cyprus has been a divided island since 15 July 1974 when a coup d’état was staged by Greek Cypriot nationalists and elements of the Greek military junta in an attempt at enosis, the incorporation of Cyprus into Greece.

This action precipitated the Turkish invasion of Cyprus, which led to the capture of the present-day territory of Northern Cyprus the following month after a ceasefire collapsed, and the displacement of over 150,000 Greek Cypriots and 50,000 Turkish Cypriots.

A separate Turkish Cypriot state in the north was established by unilateral declaration in 1983; the move was widely condemned by the international community, with Turkey alone recognizing the new state. These events and the resulting political situation are matters of a continuing dispute.

The Green line divides the North from the South, supervised by UNFICYP. Turkish Cypriots are in the North, Greek Cypriots are in the south and whilst the Turkish regime opened up several crossing points in April 2003 to allow movement across the Green line for both sides, the situation today remains unresolved, despite many years of negotiations to open up the island to joint rule.

Apostolos Andreas monastery is situated just below the tip of the Karpass peninsula in Northern Cyprus. The monastery is dedicated to Saint Andrew and is an important site for the Cypriot Orthodox Church. It was once known as “the Lourdes of Cyprus”, served not by an organized community of monks but by a changing group of volunteer priests and laymen. Both Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot communities consider the monastery a holy place. As such it is visited by many people for votive prayers.

Now the Green line crossing points are open to all, the roads are vastly improved and the journey much easier. On my last visit 6 years ago, I found it sad to see the monastery in such a dilapidated state but there has been renovation funding from Church of Cyprus, EVKAF Administration and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the buildings are now under a restoration program which appears to be partially completed.

Linking with Thursday Doors, hosted by Norm Frampton. Pop on over and check some more doors today…

Weekly Photo Challenge: Satisfaction…

Sometimes, it’s just capturing the beauty of nature for a brief moment that gives me the greatest satisfaction…

Utetheisa pulchella (Linnaeus, 1758), photographed on the Akamas peninsula, Paphos district, Cyprus, June 2017.

Satisfaction

Weekly Photo Challenge: Heritage (1) …

Cyprus Heritage.

Woman with child, circa, 2000-1800 BC, terracotta.
I photographed this figurine in the wonderful British Museum, London on my visit in 2016.

The flattened form of these distinctive terracotta sculptures has led to the term “plank figurines”. They have been found in both graves and settlements, but their function is uncertain. They are usually interpreted as either a mother goddess or a woman with a child. Not all examples hold children however, and the sex of others is unclear. Nonetheless they are probably connected with fertility, childbirth and sexuality.

Isn’t this a beautiful heritage example from ancient times in Cyprus?

Heritage

Thursday Doors, a little Konia door, Cyprus, 23/3/17…

Its a short little door post this week. My (not-so) trusty computer is still in rehab.

In my Cyprus village I pass a lovely little door most days, one of the old iron-work doors that were so popular on the island, probably during the 1950’s to 60’s.

I’m so noticing doors now, since I joined this weekly event. Previously I flashed past it on my way to somewhere, but this morning I stopped, shot and admired.

I received some sideways glances, but smiles all around when I indicated that I was admiring. It’s nicely kept too…

Linking with Thursday Doors, a weekly event hosted by Norm Frampton. Pop on over, hit the blue button and check out some more of today’s doors…

Skywatch Friday: 23/2/17…

There has been NO sky in the UAE to snap this week. The country has been covered in low hanging, sand-filled clouds, no chance to take anything interesting, it’s been a cover of haze all week, so a throwback shot of a Cyprus sunset from January 2017.

Taken from a mountain village down towards the coast, the intense colors of the setting sun are magnified over the sea.